Lotus E21 construction report part 24

Brakes, safety belts, cockpit electronics, starting cockpit padding,  brake ducts and rain light.

And again two and a half moth flew by since the last post. This time again some bits are fitted to the car and the to-do list gets shorter and shorter. The completion of the car comes closer and closer. An expected finish could be at earliest by the end of April.

Remaining to-do’s:

  • Finishing cockpit padding
  • Finshing brake ducts
  • Finishing rain light
  • Finishing wheel hubs
  • Wheel nuts
  • Wheels
  • PDRS
  • Engine cover
  • Internal aero

The first five bits on the list are a work of maybe two weeks. The car is looking more and more attractive from day to day. But to increase the suspens till the “roll” out (maybe better move out), there won’t be any picture of the ful car any more. Just on details. 🙂

img_7576

Brakes with first parts of the brake ducts. There were some thougts to make the brake ducts/covers demountable (and therefore detail out the whole brake duct stuff). But that may cause the wheels groggy when mounted…

img_7578

Finally all cockpit electronics done. I am not sure at all, if this looks like the real car. But I incorporated all electronic stuff a F1 car has into the car. So there wasn’t actually much left for the cockpit. So it looks maybe a bit empty. Anyhow, it does look not too bad.

img_7577

Cockpit padding in its current stage.

rainlight_2

Original drawing of the rain light. Thanks a lot to McLaren Electronic Systems to provide this data for free! Original link is below.

http://www.mclaren.com/appliedtechnologies/products/item/high-intensity-led-light-with-can-rainlight/

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About paulsf1

My name is Paul Bischof. I’m a student in mechanical engineering at the Technical University of Graz in Austria, expected finishing in February 2016. Since I was eight years old, I am building model planes out of paperboard. Since 2004 I scratch (that means building without an assembling set) Formula 1 and sportscars in 1:10th scale. The average time I need for such a car is around 400 to 700 hours within 4 to 8 months. One car has around 3500 up to 5000 single components. On this blog, you can take a look on my work and later, after my studies, hopefully you can see me in Formula 1.

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